Whole30-friendly Crispy Swoodles with Bacon is my latest trick to get my kids to eat veggies! I transform sweet potatoes into crispy swoodles with a spiralizer, roast them, and toss ’em with crispy bacon bits. Voila!

An overhead shot of a plate of Crispy Swoodles with Bacon, a Whole30 and paleo side dish made with spiraled sweet potatoes

Yes, I know adding bacon is cheating; after all, smoky, salty porky bits make everything taste better. But even without them, the crunchy combination of roasted sweet potatoes, carrots, and onions—finished off with a shower of fresh herbs and a splash of lime juice—will win over your pickiest eaters. And I’m not just talking about children. Even my finicky father happily tucked into a plate of swoodles thinking this was some sort of newfangled noodle dish.

A collage of the cooking to make Crispy Swoodles with Bacon.

Cooking Tips

  • Using a spiralizer will speed up the prep for this dish, but if you don’t have one on hand, you can push the vegetables through the shredder attachment of a food processor. If you’re in the market for a spiralizer, I recommend getting The Inspiralizer. (I share why I love it in my 2017 Holiday Gift Guide.)
  • I’ve tried this dish with regular white potatoes, but the sweetness of sweet potatoes yields the best flavor balance in this dish. Try not to use Garnet sweet potatoes or any of the orange-fleshed varieties, though. White-fleshed sweet potatoes (e.g., the Hannah variety) work best for this dish ’cause they’re more dry and won’t get mushy when roasted.
  • Make a big batch so you’ll have leftovers for the rest of the week!

Let’s spiralize some vegetables!

Time to make Crispy Swoodles with Bacon!

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • ½ pound bacon, cut crosswise into ¼-inch pieces
  • 2 pounds white-fleshed sweet potatoes, peeled
  • 2 large carrots, peeled (the fatter, the better for spiralizing)
  • 1 small yellow onion, peeled
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium lime
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley
  • 2 tablespoons minced chives

Equipment

Method

Preheat your oven to 400°F on convection mode (or, if you don’t have a convection function on your oven, set it to 425°F on regular mode), with the rack in the middle position.

While the oven is heating up, toss the bacon bits into a large skillet and crank the heat to medium. Cook, stirring occasionally until all the fat is rendered and the bacon is crispy, about 15 minutes.

Raw bacon sliced crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces and placed in a large cast iron skillet.

While the bacon is turning into crunchy porky bits, spiralize the sweet potatoes, carrots, and onion. Yep, you can spiralize all of them. To ensure success, make sure you’ve got thick ’n girthy veggies (at least 1½ inches in diameter) and make sure the ends are sliced smoothly and evenly. For more on how to spiralize like a boss, check out these tips.

Spiralized white sweet potatoes for Crispy Swoodles with Bacon.

Grab a rimmed baking sheet and place the veggie noodles on top. If the strands are crazy-long, use a pair of kitchen shears to cut the swoodles into more manageable lengths.

Spiralized white sweet potatoes, carrots, and onions are on a rimmed baking sheet and they are being cut with a pair of kitchen shears.

When the bacon bits are crunchy…

An overhead shot of bacon bits frying in a large cast iron skillet.

…use a slotted spoon to transfer them onto a paper towel-lined plate.

Crispy bacon bits are transferred to a paper towel-lined plate with a slotted spoon.

Toss the vegetable noodles with 1½ teaspoons kosher salt…

The spiralized vegetables are tossed with kosher salt.

…and the reserved bacon drippings.

The reserved bacon grease is poured onto the salted spiralized vegetables.

(If you want to make this dish vegetarian-friendly, substitute ⅓ cup olive oil or avocado oil in place of the bacon grease.)

An overhead shot of the swoodles in a rimmed baking sheet, ready to go in the oven.

Place the tray of veggies into the oven and roast for a total of 35 to 45 minutes, stirring the veggies every 10-15 minutes to make sure they cook evenly.

Crispy Swoodles being tossed by a pair of tongs as it cooks in the oven.

The swoodles are done when the veggies are tender and have crispy bits all over. Watch your veggies like a hawk in the last 10 minutes to ensure that the onions and sweet potatoes don’t burn!

The Crispy Swoodles with crispy browned bits right out of the oven.

Squirt on the juice from one lime and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Adding fresh lime juice and freshly cracked black pepper to Crispy Swoodles with Bacon.

Pro tip: the best way to extract as much juice as possible from a lime is to cut slices parallel to the central core. This method ensures that a lot of surface area is exposed and the seeds are left in the center.

A four-shot of how to cut limes to get the most juice out of them.

Top the roasted swoodles with a shower of chopped parsley, chives, and crispy bacon bits.

Adding bacon bits and fresh herbs to Crispy Swoodles.

Serve immediately with your favorite roasted meats or seafood.

Scooping a plate of Crispy Swoodles with bacon with a pair of tongs.

If you’ve got any leftovers, you can store them in the fridge for up to a week or in the freezer for a few months.

A shot of someone in a red apron holding a large plate of Crispy Swoodles With Bacon.

Psst! Here’s a great breakfast idea: in the morning, make a yummy fried egg in a swoodle nest!

An overhead shot of a fried egg in a Crispy Swoodles with Bacon nest!


Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013), Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017), and Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2021).


PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Crispy Swoodles with Bacon

4.88 from 16 votes
Prep Time5 minutes
Cook Time1 hour
Servings 6 servings
This crunchy combo of bacon, roasted sweet potatoes, carrots, and onions—finished off with fresh herbs and lime juice—will win over your pickiest eaters.

Ingredients  

  • ½ pound bacon cut crosswise into ¼-inch pieces
  • 2 pounds white-fleshed sweet potatoes peeled
  • 2 large carrots peeled (the fatter, the better for spiralizing)
  • 1 small yellow onion peeled
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium lime
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley
  • 2 tablespoons minced chives

Instructions 

  • Preheat your oven to 400°F on convection mode (or, if you don’t have a convection function on your oven, set it to 425°F on regular mode), with the rack in the middle position.
  • While the oven is heating up, toss the bacon bits into a large skillet and crank the heat to medium. Cook, stirring occasionally until all the fat is rendered and the bacon is crispy, about 15 minutes.
  • While the bacon is turning into crunchy porky bits, spiralize the sweet potatoes, carrots, and onion. To ensure success, make sure you’ve got thick ’n girthy veggies (at least 1½ inches in diameter) and make sure the ends are sliced smoothly and evenly.
  • Grab a rimmed baking sheet and place the veggie noodles on top. If the strands are crazy-long, use a pair of kitchen shears to cut the swoodles into more manageable lengths.
  • When the bacon bits are crunchy, use a slotted spoon to transfer them onto a paper towel-lined plate.
  • Toss the vegetable noodles with 1½ teaspoons kosher salt and the reserved bacon drippings. (If you want to make this dish vegetarian-friendly, substitute ⅓ cup olive oil or avocado oil in place of the bacon grease.)
  • Place the tray of veggies into the oven and roast for a total of 35 to 45 minutes, stirring the veggies every 10-15 minutes to make sure they cook evenly.
  • The swoodles are done when the veggies are tender and have crispy bits all over. Watch your veggies like a hawk in the last 10 minutes to ensure that the onions and sweet potatoes don’t burn!
  • Squirt on the juice from one lime and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Top the roasted swoodles with a shower of chopped parsley, chives, and crispy bacon bits. Serve immediately with your favorite roasted meats or seafood.

Video

Notes

If you’ve got any leftovers, you can store them in the fridge for up to a week or in the freezer for a few months.

Nutrition

Calories: 307kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 15g | Fiber: 6g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Like this? Leave a comment below!

About Michelle Tam

Hello! My name is Michelle Tam, and I love to eat. I think about food all the time. It borders on obsession. I’ve always loved the sights and smells of the kitchen. My mother was (and is) an excellent cook, and as a kid, I was her little shadow as she prepared supper each night. From her, I gained a deep, abiding love for magically transforming pantry items into mouth-watering family meals.

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10 Comments

    1. Maybe only a day ahead or so and keep in an airtight container. Once the veggies are spiralized, they start discoloring and can get wilty.

  1. I wish I knew why we can’t get hannah variety sweet potatoes in Ontario where I live. What’s the deal with these things? I see so many bloggers use them and I can’t find them anywhere! This dish looks delicious and I’m disappointed I won’t be able to try it. I will save it just in case this changes. Thanks for your recipes!!

  2. This dish is delicious. We’ve tried a lot of your recipes and they’ve all been wonderful. You really saved me when we started out on our paleo journey about seven years ago.
    Thank you for all you do.

  3. Hi,
    This looks amazing – we need to make it lower carb though, so I’m wondering if another veg would roast well? I thought of zucchini but don’t know if they would ever get crispy at all, with all the water in them. I thought also of turnips but IDK how easy they would be to spiralize or how they would taste – so far I only like turnips used in place of white potatoes in stew or soup. I like parsnips but IDK how much lower carb they would be. Anyway, I thought I’d ask “the expert” and see what you think! Thanks!

  4. How do you prepare these once taking them back out of the freezer? Defrost in the fridge? Cook from frozen? Either way how do you warm them back up without ruining them?

  5. 5 stars
    These are SO delicious, even more than I would have thought from reading the recipe! I’m not sure if we have ready access to white sweet potatoes around here, but I swapped in one regular orange sweet potato + one white potato (did not peel either one) and it worked well.