Matcha pudding is a simple and creamy paleo dessert that you can whip together with just a few ingredients. If you love Japanese green tea, this dreamy non-dairy, gluten-free, and egg-free treat will hit the spot!

A closeup shot of paleo matcha pudding in a clear glass, topped with fresh raspberries.

It’s no secret that I love matcha SO VERY MATCHA. So much so that I’m droppin’ puns like a dad! Longtime Nomsters know that I’m kind of obsessed with matcha, which is why I incorporate this finely milled Japanese green tea leaf into lots of recipes (e.g. Matcha Mug Cake, Cold Matcha Latte, No-Bake Matcha Cheesecake, Matcha Coconut Gummies, and Cold Brew Matcha). If you’re not a fan of pumpkin-spiced everything in the autumn, give this delicious matcha pudding a shot—it has just the right amount of sweetness, and the coconut milk infuses this treat with healthy fat!

(Not a fan of matcha but still want pudding? Make my Paleo Pudding Parfaits!)

Which matcha should I use?

Because this matcha pudding is made with only six ingredients, you should use a high quality, bright green matcha. Yes, you can choose to use a cheaper culinary grade matcha, but beware: the grayish color and slight bitterness will come through in the dessert. What’s my favorite matcha? I love this brand and I use Breakaway’s Cold Brew Reserve in most of my recipes because it’s always in my fridge. (Save 20% with the code nomnompaleo — not sponsored or an affiliate, I just love it.)

Can I use another nut milk instead?

Sure! I’ve tried this pudding with almond and cashew milk, and either will work. However, full-fat coconut milk is creamier and yields a thicker pudding. Heck, you can even use whole milk if you tolerate dairy.

Whip it good!

When you first take this matcha pudding out of the fridge, it’ll be a jiggly green gelatinous mass. Here’s what’ll flash through your noggin: WHUT?! THIS IS NOT THE SOFT, CREAMY PUDDING YOU PROMISED ME! Calm yourself. The key to the creamy texture is to whip it with a hand mixer—and to continue whipping until the jello-y chunks transform into a smooth and creamy pudding. It’ll happen—but not if you try to do it with a fork. Also, if you refrigerate the whipped pudding to eat later, you’ll have to whip it again to achieve the same soft texture.

Time to make matcha pudding!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 teaspoons matcha
  • 1 can (13.5 ounces) full fat coconut milk, divided
  • 2 teaspoons gelatin
  • 2 tablespoons honey (or more to taste)
  • ⅛ teaspoon Diamond Crystal brand kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 12 raspberries (optional garnish)

Equipment:

  • All my favorite kitchen tools are listed on this constantly updated Amazon page.

Method:

Measure out the matcha into a small bowl.

Someone spooning bright green matcha powder into a small bowl to make matcha pudding.

Shake the can of coconut milk well, and whisk ¼ cup of it with the matcha. (It’s okay if the coconut milk has some clumps—you’ll blend them smooth with an immersion blender later.)

Pouring coconut milk into the bowl with the matcha and stirring it with a whisk.

Stir in the gelatin to bloom/rehydrate. Set the bowl aside.

Adding a spoonful of gelatin to the coconut milk and matcha mixture for paleo matcha pudding.
Next, heat the remaining coconut milk, honey, and salt over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the sweetened milk is steaming, but not boiling.

Three shots showing someone adding honey and salt into coconut milk in a small saucepan.
Once the flavored coconut milk is hot, take the pot off the heat and add the gelatin/matcha/coconut milk mixture to the pot and stir well.

A blue silicone spatula spoons the matcha and gelatin mixture into the heated coconut milk.Pour in the vanilla extract.

Pouring in vanilla extract into the small saucepan filled with hot coconut matcha milk.

Use an immersion blender to whisk everything together, or transfer the matcha milk to a blender and mix until uniform. No matcha chunks, please!

Blending the matcha coconut milk mixture with an immersion blender in the small saucepan.

Pour the matcha mixture into a medium bowl. Chill the pudding in the fridge for 30 minutes uncovered. Then, cover and chill for an additional 1½ hours or until solid. You can keep the pudding in the fridge for up to 4 days before serving.

A medium bowl filled with matcha pudding ready for the refrigerator.
When you’re ready to serve the pudding, grab a hand mixer and beat the pudding until it’s nice and fluffy. Be patient—it will go from chunky to smooth, I promise!

A hand mixer blends the chilled matcha pudding until is creamy and smooth.
Divide the pudding into four bowls or cups.

Spooning the creamy matcha pudding into a clear glass serving container.

Plop on some fresh raspberries, if desired, and serve ’em up!

A side shot of dairy-free matcha pudding in a clear glass with a spoon inside.

Want more Paleo Pudding Recipes? Make these desserts:


Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013), Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017), and Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2021).


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Matcha Pudding

4.89 from 9 votes
Prep Time10 minutes
Cook Time20 minutes
Chilling time2 hours
Servings 4
Matcha pudding is a simple and creamy paleo dessert that you can whip together with just a few ingredients. If you love Japanese green tea, this dreamy non-dairy, gluten-free, and egg-free treat will hit the spot!

Ingredients 
 

Instructions 

  • Measure out the matcha into a small bowl.
  • Shake the can of coconut milk well, and whisk ¼ cup of it with the matcha. (It’s okay if the coconut milk has some clumps—you’ll blend them smooth with an immersion blender later.)
  • Stir in the gelatin to bloom/rehydrate. Set the bowl aside.
  • Next, heat the remaining coconut milk, honey, and salt over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the sweetened milk is steaming, but not boiling.
  • Once the flavored coconut milk is hot, take the pot off the heat and add the gelatin/matcha/coconut milk mixture to the pot and stir well. Pour in the vanilla extract.
  • Use an immersion blender to whisk everything together, or transfer the matcha milk to a blender and mix until uniform. No matcha chunks, please!
  • Pour the matcha mixture into a medium bowl. Chill the pudding in the fridge for 30 minutes uncovered. Then, cover and chill for an additional 1½ hours or until solid. You can keep the pudding in the fridge for up to 4 days before serving.
  • When you’re ready to serve the pudding, grab a hand mixer and beat the pudding until it’s nice and fluffy. Be patient—it will go from chunky to smooth, I promise!
  • Divide the pudding into four bowls or cups. Plop on some fresh raspberries, if desired, and serve ’em up!

Video

Notes

  • If you refrigerate the leftover pudding, beat it again with a hand or stand mixer to get the creamy pudding texture.
  • You can store the pudding in the fridge for up to four days.

Nutrition

Calories: 239kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 20g | Fiber: 1g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Like this? Leave a comment below!

About Michelle Tam

Hello! My name is Michelle Tam, and I love to eat. I think about food all the time. It borders on obsession. I’ve always loved the sights and smells of the kitchen. My mother was (and is) an excellent cook, and as a kid, I was her little shadow as she prepared supper each night. From her, I gained a deep, abiding love for magically transforming pantry items into mouth-watering family meals.

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5 Comments

  1. What do you think about subsituting the matcha for unsweetened cocoa powder? Then I can make matcha for the grown ups and chocolate for the wee ones

  2. I have a friend who loves matcha and is vegan, but is also allergic to coconut. I worry about the difference in the fat content if I substitute another vegan milk alternative. Any suggestions on how to adapt?