Nom Nom Paleo

Porkitos! (a.k.a. Crispy Prosciutto Chips)

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I prefer prosciutto chips to bacon bits because they cook evenly and there aren’t any unappetizing flabby parts. These “Porkitos” also add a terrific salty crunch to creamy soups, salads, and purées. Or you can just stuff your face with them.

'Cause really — who doesn’t like crispy, porky chips?

Here’s what to gather to make a tray of crunchy Porkitos (feeds 1-2 people):

  • 3 ounces of thinly sliced Prosciutto di Parma (Try to get freshly-sliced prosciutto from the deli counter and make sure they cut it paper thin.)

Here’s how to make ‘em:

Preheat the oven to 350°F with the rack in the middle.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper…

…and place the prosciutto in a single layer on top. Don’t overcrowd the swine or it won’t crisp properly.

Once the oven is ready, place the the tray in the oven.

Bake for 10-15 minutes (depending on the thickness of your prosciutto slices) or until crunchy. Watch your chips like a hawk to make sure they don’t burn. Burnt chips make Nom Nom wanna smash things.

Transfer the chips to a wire rack to cool.

They’ll actually get crunchier as they cool, so it’s better to err on the side of under-baking them. Look — like stained glass (only swine-ier)!

With Brussels sprouts chips, kale chips, mushroom chips (recipe available on my iPad app), and now PORKITOS, who needs boring old potato chips?

Day 10 of Whole30 Eats

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Today I was busy, busy, busy preparing Whole30 nosh.

For breakfast, I made myself another frittata. This time I made one with three eggs, mushrooms, leftover roasted bell peppers, nuked frozen spinach, and chopped shallots.

I took the extra minute to nuke the spinach and squeeze out the liquid, which saved me at least 5 minutes under the broiler. However, sautéing the filling added back at least 10 minutes.

That’s okay because it was worth the extra time. (But really: Can you ever go wrong with frittata? Answer: No.)

My morning snack consisted of some coconut flakes, macadamia nuts, and a heaping tablespoon of coconut butter.

For lunch, I ate a leftover box of last night’s chicken-in-the-pot and garlic and cauliflower mashed “potatoes.”

Dang, this recipe is a keeper.

After lunch, I was kid-less for a couple hours (the big rugrat was at a playdate and the little one was napping) so I set about making some Paleo snacks and prepping meat for future meals. First up: snacks. I hard-boiled some eggs and baked a big batch of crispy kale chips.

I also seasoned and marinated a boneless pork leg that came in my meat CSA box — I’m going to finish cooking it tomorrow, so stay tuned…

Then, I sous-vided four boneless and skinless chicken breasts (for emergency protein)…

…and 4 boneless pork loin chops (seasoned with Dukka).

I cooked all that meat at 140 F for around 3 hours.

Amidst all this cooking, I scarfed down an afternoon snack of red bell peppers and guacamole.

For dinner, I fried up the sous vide pork chops and served them with roasted broccoli tossed with avocado oil and winter squash puree with coconut oil.

I was still hungry so I helped myself to a little cup of coconut milk. After all that effort in the kitchen, I think I deserved it, don’t you?

Baked Kale Chips

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For years, my super-chef sister’s been telling me about kale chips. In my pre-Paleo life, I tried making them a few times, but I found it soooo much easier to tear open a bag of potato chips. Since going Paleo, though, baked kale chips have made a huge a comeback in our house.

To make kale chips, however, there are a few key points to keep in mind:

  1. The kale leaves must be SUPER DRY.
  2. Bake the kale at 350°F.
  3. Cook the chips for 12 minutes.
  4. Salt AFTER the kale chips are out of the oven.

Here’s what you need to make your own chips:

  • 2 bunches of kale
  • 1-2 tablespoons of avocado oil
  • fleur de sel or your favorite seasoning salt

Here’s what to do:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Then, remove the leaves from the stems and wash the leaves well in a few changes of water. (The stuff I buy from the farmer’s market is often dirty. I don’t know about you, but I find that chips taste better sans dirt.)

Then, in small batches, spin the leaves dry in a salad spinner.

Pro tip: If at all possible, use child labor to help with the spinning.

Toss the dry leaves with avocado oil and use your hands to distribute the oil evenly.

Then, line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lay some of the leaves on top in a single layer.

Make sure the leaves are all flat and not folded over or they won’t crisp properly.

Pop the tray in the oven, and…

…after just 12 minutes, the chips’ll be done! (Set your timer and keep an eye on the kale, ‘cause if the chips burns, they’ll be bitter — and so will you.)

Once the kale’s out of the oven, season the chips with some fleur de sel or your favorite seasoning salt.

Eat ‘em up!