Stir Fried Kelp Noodles Made With The Dregs From My Fridge

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Tonight, I decided to make stir fried kelp noodles again. Why? Because I’m at the end of my 7-night shift work week and I’m too damn tired to come up with something original and Whole30 approved. For this variation I added some anchovy fillets to fill the void left by the lack of fish sauce and some homemade chicken broth to help soften the kelp noodles faster.

(Yep, you read that right. I made my chicken broth from scratch using the bones I removed from the crispy sous vide chicken thighs a few nights ago. On my work week. Tells you how easy it is and how I should stop being so effing lazy).

For all stir fries, I just look in my fridge and pick some aromatics (shallots and garlic), a protein or two (eggs and ground pork), and some veggies that are wilting (broccoli slaw, shredded carrots, pre-washed baby spinach). Once everything is prepped and cut, you just sequentially throw it in your pan and you’re done. Dinner can be on the table in 30 minutes.

Here’s what I assembled for tonight’s dish:

  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large shallots, minced in mini prep food processor
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 anchovy fillets packed in olive oil
  • 1 pound of ground pork
  • 1 package of kelp noodles, rinsed and drained
  • 6 ounce package of prewashed baby spinach
  • 1 cup of broccoli slaw
  • 1 cup of shredded carrots
  • 2-4 tablespoons of coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon of coconut vinegar
  • ¼ cup of chicken broth
  • 2-3 tablespoons of macadamia nut oil

Here’s how I got dinner on the table:

The first thing I did was make a thin scrambled egg omelet. I heated a tablespoon of macadamia nut oil in my 12-inch cast iron skillet on medium high and whisked the eggs with some salt and pepper. Once the pan was hot, I poured in the eggs making sure it was a uniform layer and turned the heat down to low.

Once the bottom set, I flipped it over with a spatula. I tore the omelet but I didn’t care because I ended up cutting it into strips.

Then, I added another tablespoon of macadamia nut oil to the pan and sautéed the shallots. When the shallots were softened, I threw in the anchovies and broke it up with my wooden spoon.

I added the pork and garlic, seasoned with some salt and pepper, and cooked the meat until it was no longer pink.

I added the kelp noodles (which I cut with some scissors) and chicken broth.

Then I seasoned everything with the coconut aminos and vinegar and covered the pan for about 5 minutes to soften the kelp noodles.

Once the noodles were soft, I added the broccoli slaw and shredded carrots and mixed that around.

Next, I threw in the baby spinach with some additional salt and pepper and stir fried until the leaves were wilted.

At the very end, I tossed in the sliced egg omelet.

Voila!

As a veggie side, I roasted some cauliflower seasoned with Dukka seasoning, Kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper, and thinly sliced shallots (400 F set at convection roast, 15 minutes covered and 15 minutes uncovered).

Here’s my plate.

The rest of the family also enjoyed some pork butt braised in Coca Cola and soy sauce that my mother-in-law brought over but I stuck to my guns and ate what I had prepared.

Not too shabby for a quick, well-rounded dish. I still missed the sweetness from fish sauce and/or oyster sauce but I’ll just deal with it for the next 23 days. Maybe next time I’ll add some red pepper flakes or chilis in place of the Sriracha I can’t use either.

Curried Ground Pork and Broccoli Slaw Frittata

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I was inspired to make a frittata a tonight after seeing the yummy ones posted on The Paleo Table , Balanced Bites, and Everyday Paleo blogs. Plus, I woke up later than usual tonight, so I needed a dish that I could throw on the table pretty quickly.

For dinner, I like to make really meat-heavy frittatas — kinda like Cha Trung Hap, the steamed egg and pork meatloaf thingy you get when you order rice plate at some Vietnamese places. (Come to think of it, I bet I could make a Paleo version with kelp noodles…)

I decided to make a curry-flavored frittata with ground pork and broccoli slaw since I had those ingredients readily available. I followed the same frittata guidelines that I posted previously with some slight modifications that I’ll detail below. There’s no hard and fast rule for how to make frittatas, so feel free to experiment!  

Here’s what I assembled to serve 4 people:

  •  ½ onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound of ground pork
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup of shredded broccoli slaw
  • 6 large eggs
  • ½ cup of shredded carrots
  • ¼ cup coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon of curry powder
  • ¼ cup roughly chopped Italian parsley
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

And here’s what I did with all this stuff:

I assembled all the ingredients…

… heated up the coconut oil on medium heat in an 8-inch cast iron skillet (you can use a slightly larger skillet but I like frittatas that slice up thick), and sautéed my onions with a dash of salt until they were softened.

I added the ground pork and garlic…

…and stir fried until the meat was no longer pink.

While the pork and onions were cooking, I whisked my eggs with the coconut milk, curry powder, salt, pepper, and parsley.

I don’t have an exact measurement for the salt and pepper. Just don’t be too heavy-handed ‘cause the filling will be seasoned as well.

Then I added the broccoli slaw and carrots to the pork and onions and sprinkled everything with salt and pepper.

I poured on the egg mixture and cooked the frittata for ~5 minutes to set the bottom.

I tried to cover the frittata but the skillet was filled to the brim.

I put my frittata in my preheated toaster oven set on broil. I would’ve put it in at a lower temperature (350 F) but I didn’t have 20-30 minutes to spare. Around ten minutes later, the edges were browned and puffy. But when I touched the center, it was a little gushy — and when I cut it in half, it was still kinda liquid-y. Darn it! 

So I popped the frittata back under the broiler for another few minutes to firm up the middle. The split down the middle helps speed up the cooking — it’s just not as pretty if you’re planning to serve the frittata whole.

I served the slices with some nuked frozen veggies (which we deemed not photo-worthy) and we dug in.

Frittata With Leftover Tabil-Spiced Pork, Spinach, and Tomatoes

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This morning I threw together a frittata with some leftovers and a couple wrinkly tomatoes on the counter.

After I whipped up three eggs with some salt and pepper, I heated some coconut oil in my little cast iron skillet over medium heat. I added about a cup of leftover Tabil-spiced pork and spinach and sautéed for about a minute until it was warmed through.

Then, I added some diced tomatoes and stirred that around for an additional minute.

I added the three eggs and let the bottom of the frittata set for a few minutes.

I popped the skillet in my toaster oven and broiled the frittata for ~10 minutes.

The middle was set and the edges were puffed and browned.

I split the frittata with Fitbomb and served it up with some nuked frozen broccoli.

I originally thought Fitbomb broke his fast because my breakfast was just too tempting to pass up but then I found out he had an ass-kicking WOD this morning.

Pork and Spinach Stuffed Kabocha Squash

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I was inspired to come up with this recipe after reading Dorie Greenspan’s recipe for Pumpkin Stuffed With Everything Good. Actually, it’s stuffed with lots of Paleo-unfriendly badness (though I would’ve scarfed it down a few months ago). I decided to stuff a Kabocha squash that was taking up real estate on my counter with pork and spinach. Dorie’s recipe takes around 2 hours to complete which is totally unacceptable to me so I nuked the squash first to halve the cooking time. Also, Kabocha is a drier and starchier squash so make sure to add the chicken broth to the filling.

What to assemble:

  • One 2 pound Kabocha squash
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 2 cups of frozen spinach
  • 2 large shallots, minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon Tabil seasoning
  • ¼ cup chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

What to do:

Take the top off the squash and scoop out the seeds.

Season the inside of the squash with salt and pepper. Put the squash upside down in a microwaveable container, add a splash of water, cover with a lid, and nuke for 8-10 minutes to soften.

In the meantime, prepare the filling. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Then, add minced shallots and sauté until they’re translucent. Throw in the minced garlic and stir it around until it’s fragrant (~30 seconds). Add the ground pork and cook it until it’s no longer pink.

Season the pork to taste with salt and pepper  and add 1 tablespoon of Tabil.  Add 2 cups of frozen spinach (bagged spinach, not the frozen block spinach) straight from the freezer and stir everything until the spinach defrosts.

Remove the squash out of the microwave and place it on a foil lined baking tray. Fill the squash up to the top (I had about 1/3 of the filling left over that I will chow on later this week).

Add the chicken broth to the filling and cover with the top of the squash. Place the stuffed squash in the oven for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until the flesh is easily pierced with a knife.

Fitbomb and I split the squash in half…

…and ate it with some sliced tomatoes and nuked green beans with butter, salt, and pepper.

Tasty and easy – just how I like my dishes!

Quick Ground Pork Stir-Fry For When I Don’t Wanna Cook

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I had some defrosted ground pork in the fridge that I needed to cook up but I had no fricking idea what I wanted to do with it.  Correction.  I had a ton of ideas for what I could make (e.g. skinless gyoza , pork larb, meatballs) but I was too lazy to make anything too involved. 

Inspired by this pork and shrimp lettuce wraps recipe over at www.cavemengourmet.com, I decided to make a quick stir-fry with items in my fridge and pantry.  I’ve cut back on cooking Asian dishes because all my favorite condiments are decidedly not Paleo – oyster sauce, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, mirin, seasoned rice vinegar, any store-bought Asian sauce/marinade.  How the hell can I make Asian food taste right?  You need the right balance of sweet, savory, sour, and umami. 

After looking at my pantry, I found some good replacement items.  For umami flavor, fish sauce is great.  Although Fitbomb likes to avoid soy products, I do have some wheat-free tamari on hand for savory and umami flavoring. To add some sour flavor, I have a variety of vinegars and some lemons/limes in my fridge.

For my pork stir-fry tonight, these are the ingredients I wrangled up:

·      1 lb of pasture raised ground pork

·      2 cups of thinly sliced cremini mushrooms

·      1 onion chopped finely in my mini-prep

·      1 inch knob of ginger grated on a microplane (I keep my ginger in the freezer)

·      3 garlic cloves squeezed through my garlic press

·      4 cups of pre-washed baby spinach

·      1-2 tablespoons of fish sauce

·      1 tablespoon of wheat-free tamari

·      1-2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar

·      1-2 tablespoons of coconut oil

·      kosher salt and pepper to taste

Here’s how I threw it all together:

I heated up some coconut oil in my skillet over medium-high heat.  Then I added the onion and once they were translucent, I threw in the mushrooms.   Once the vegetables cooked down, I put in the ground pork, garlic, and ginger.  I added the fish sauce, tamari, and vinegar (all the measurements above are estimations).   Once the sauces were mixed in, I added the spinach and stirred them around until they wilted.  I tasted for seasoning and added salt and pepper as needed. 


I just scooped up the sir-fry and plopped it in a bowl and chowed down.  Yummy, but in the future, I’ll serve it with some cauliflower fried “rice.”