Nom Nom Paleo

Quick & Simple Roasted Rack of Lamb

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I’ve never made rack of lamb at home before because it always seemed overly intimidating. And ‘cause I’m lazy.

But when I was at Trader Joe’s this afternoon, the little itty packs of frenched lamb racks looked pretty harmless…and tasty. So on a whim, I bought some. Turns out rack of lamb is easy to make and take no time at all. Plus, if you have a kick-ass meat thermometer, there’s no way you can mess this up.

Here’s what I assembled to feed two people:

  • 1 rack of lamb (~1 pound)
  • 1 tablespoon of Dukka seasoning
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil

Here’s what I did:

Basically, I followed the directions in my Cook’s Illustrated The Best Meat Recipes book for roasting a rack of lamb. Those kitchen nerds haven’t let me down yet!

I preheated my oven to 425 F and placed a foil-lined baking sheet on a rack in the lower middle of my oven.

After seasoning the lamb very generously with salt and pepper, I sprinkled on the Dukka seasoning.

Per my chef sister, you should always try to salt your meats ahead of time (up to 24 hours), but I salted them only 10 minutes prior to searing. Still, the chops tasted great.

I heated 2 tablespoons of coconut oil over high heat in my large cast iron skillet, and when it began smoking, I added the rack of lamb, meat side down. I let the meat sizzle for 4 minutes until a nice crust formed. Then, I flipped the rack over and cooked it for 2 more minutes on the other side.

Next, the rack went into the oven on the preheated baking sheet.

In case you’re wondering, inside those two other foil packets were Portobello mushrooms that I planned to serve as a side dish.

I roasted the lamb for roughly 12-15 minutes, If you want it cooked medium rare, wait ‘til the temperature of the meat reaches 125 degrees; for medium, wait for it to hit 130 degrees. Mine ended up closer to 133 degrees because I kind of forgot to check on my lamb.

After I removed the rack from the oven…

I loosely tented it with foil and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Then, I sliced the rack into four pieces (2 ribs per slice) and served it up.

Who knew roasted rack of lamb could go from fridge to table in just 30 minutes?

Stock Your Pantry with Spice Hound Spice Blends

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I love to eat but am incredibly lazy. Good thing I’m willing to pay through the nose for items that make me seem like a good cook without any actual technical skill (e.g. SousVide Supreme).

In all seriousness, I think if you use high quality ingredients, your food will taste awesome without too much work.  And you don’t have to spend a ton of money.  For example, I love the spice blends from local spice purveyor Spice Hound.  They’re all really fresh, unique, and tasty and they cost ~$6-7 per half-cup container. I’m always on the look out for new spice blends because they’ll help you save so much time in the kitchen.

I bought these three sugar-free blends at the farmers’ market last Saturday:

Tabil is a Tunisian spice blend with a spicy kick made with coriander, minced garlic, crushed red pepper, and caraway seeds.  I cooked up some ground beef and diced onions tonight and seasoned it with some Tabil, salt, and pepper.  The dish took minimal work but tasted amazing.

Fajita & Taco Seasoning is a fantastic blend with ancho, Mexican oregano, garlic, thyme, tomato, sea salt, Worcestershire.  The crap you get at the store always has tons of sugar. I know you can make your own (and I have) but I’m lazy, remember?

 

I am really excited to experiment with Dukka.  It’s a traditional Egyptian spice blend with hazelnuts, sesame seeds, coriander, and cumin. 

The owner, Tammy Tan, is super nice, informative, and helpful. They have a new storefront in San Francisco and stands at a ton of farmers’ markets in the Bay Area.  I can’t wait to try more of their spices, salts, and blends!